Federal Energy Stimulus Check: This Program Offers Up to $1,800 in Assistance

Stimulus Check
Stimulus Checks

While the money from the federal stimulus checks may not come directly, Americans can enjoy the indirect benefits the federal government provides to get some relief at least from the inflation’s impact. For example, Washington residents can use federal programs to take care of a maximum of $1,800 when it comes to the costs of energy. This energy incentive check from the federal government is a component of the Low Income Housing Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP).

Federal Energy Incentive Stimulus Check: What Exactly Is It?

Under Washington DC’s LIHEAP program, residents can receive an incentive/cash assistance check ranging from $250 to $1,800 to cover cooling and heating costs.

According to the District of Columbia Energy Department, the quantity of assistance a household receives depends on household size, home type, heat source, and total income of the household. The LIHEAP incentive program offers 2 types of help and stimulus checks: regular assistance and emergency assistance. The program provides regular assistance for energy costs once every year from October 1st till October 30th and provides emergency assistance if residents lose gas or electricity or run out of heating oil.

Between October 1 – September 1, 2021, he has the right to receive the energy stimulus check during this fiscal year. As of January 30, 2022, the highest allowed annual income when it comes to the single-person household is $42,920. For a two-person household, the income threshold stands at $56,126.

For a household consisting of three members, the income threshold stands at $69,332. For a four-member family, the income threshold stands at $82,538. For a five-member household, the income threshold stands at $95,744. For a six-member household, the income threshold stands at $108,950. For a seven-member household, the income threshold stands at $111,426. For an eight-member household, the income threshold stands at $113,902.

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